Al Jazeera

France 24

BBC News

Reuters News

  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
prev
next

Yemen rivals sign peace deal but will it last

News image

After the Houthis rebels took over a number of government buildings in the capital including the defence ministry’s headquarters, the army headquarters, the parliament building, the Central Bank and the national radio and TV station in the capital, Sanaa, UN special envoy Jamal Benomar, who had held talks with Houthi leader Abdulmalek al-Houthi in their home province of Saada, announced that an agreement had been reached to end fighting. Yemen’s President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi urged all sides in the crisis to abide by the deal.

Features | Ali Bahaijoub | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

Attacks urged on Egyptian security forces and dissenters rot in jail

News image

Islamic State urged insurgents in Egypt’s Sinai Peninsula to press ahead with attacks against Egyptian security forces, a call likely to deepen concern over ties between the militant groups. A roadside bomb blast killed three police officers near Egypt’s foreign ministry in downtown Cairo last month. The blast also injured several civilians when it exploded in the neighbourhood of Boulaq Abu Eila, sending a plume of smoke over the government building. Security officials speaking under condition of anonymity said that the roadside bomb had targeted a police checkpoint near the back entrance of the Nile-side ministry building.

Features | Alan Brown | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

US airstrikes against ISIS to last for months

News image

The airstrikes - which employed U.S. Tomahawk missiles, B1 bombers, F16, F18 and F22 strike fighters and drones and fpor the first time the stealth F-22 Raptor fighter jet- were backed by support from Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, Jordan and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) - a coalition of nations that has agreed to assist with the destruction of ISIS. That was ‘only the beginning’ of a ‘credible and sustainable, persistent’ coalition effort to degrade and ultimately destroy ISIS militants and other extremist groups, the American military said.

Features | Ali Bahaijoub | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

Global reactions to Scottish referendum

News image

Political leaders and commentators worldwide have given mixed reactions to Scotland voting against leaving Britain, writes Franklin Adesegha. While much of the international coverage of the referendum result has been positive, with everyone from Chinese media to German ministers cheering the no vote, other countries were less supportive. Among those criticizing the way the independence referendum

Cover Stories | Franklin Adesegha | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

Did Scotland reject independence after promised reforms?

News image

British Prime Minister David Cameron is on the back foot after angry backbenchers from his ruling Conservative party slammed his ‘reckless’ election promises to Scotland during the country’s failed independence bid, writes Franklin Adesegha London mayor Boris Johnson, widely tipped to become the next Conservative party leader, criticised Mr Cameron for his ‘reckless’ promise to protect the subsidy handed to Scotland under the ‘Barnett Formula’, a vow made by all three main party leaders in the dying days of the referendum campaign.

Cover Stories | Franklin Adesegha | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

What happens now in Scotland?

News image

Scotland will remain as part of the United Kingdom (UK), with its own Parliament. The UK and Scottish governments will continue to make the changes to the powers of the Scottish Parliament that were agreed in the Scotland Act 2012. Further devolution of financial powers to the Scottish Parliament will come into effect from April 2015 and April 2016. The next powers to be devolved are: 1. Stamp duty land tax and landfill tax

Cover Stories | Ali Bahaijoub | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more

Scotland: Where next for Britain?

News image

The exciting finale to the bid for Scottish independence has opened a Pandora’s box of questions none of which will be answered either easily or justly. The referendum saw the highest electoral turnout since 1951, ranging between 84 and 86 per cent of registered voters. The world, meanwhile, watched unbelieving that a united Britain would destroy itself after 300 years of union but in the event the vote was 55 to 45 to maintain the Union. What the referendum did do was reveal the deep flaws in the British political system. The last minute spectacle of the three political leaders David Cameron (Conservative party in government), Ed Miliband (Labour), and Nick Clegg (Liberal and part of government Coalition) jointly journeying to Scotland to promise reforms to save the Union only emphasised the shameful way they had treated the Scottish question in the past.

Cover Stories | Guy Arnold | 1 October 2014 | Hits: 0

Read more
News Feeds

Newsletter subscription

Stock Info

Microsoft 45.90 ▼0.46 (-0.99%)
Google 568.27 ▼9.09 (-1.57%)
Yahoo 40.32 ▼0.43 (-1.06%)